What Makes A Horror Film Entertaining

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

In horror films, there is always one scene that opens up the perceived realm of normality to that of fear and confusion. Directors and authors alike use these scenes to show the change in the pace of the film. In both the movie Psycho (1960) and Carrie (1976), shower scenes are used to mark this epic turning point with sexuality, blood and voyeurism; the most important ingredients to horror.
The idea of sneaking around and peering into forbidden places gives just about everyone a thrill. Voyeurism is used strongly in both Psycho and Carrie due to its ability to entice thrill in the viewer. In Carrie, we start the scene by looking into a girls' high school locker room; scantily clad or naked girls moving in slow-motion in front of the camera give the thrill of both trespassing and the chance of being caught. The camera gradually slides across the locker room floor, slowly so as to allow us to look at the changing girls. We stop at the last row and are slowly walked into the steamy row of showers where we find a naked Carrie White (Sissy Spacek). In Psycho, after Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins) leaves Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) to her room, he goes back to his office for a reason we're not quite clear about yet. He hesitates at the wall between his office and Marion's room, glancing around for anyone who might be watching him. The room's under-lighting gives both Norman and the stuffed birds around him an evil and devious look. Finally he looks at the wall and removes a painting, a painting depicting the Rape of Lucretia, and reveals a
peephole into Marion's hotel room. He puts his eye up to the hole and we are graced – 1 –
with the view of Marion in just a black bra and slip, the color hinting to the illicitness of the moment. We are then given an extreme close-up of Norman's eye, staring wide into the room; the view we have gives us the thrill of actually being there, watching Ma