Uses & function of the irreverent in

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The irreverent is defined as lacking proper respect or seriousness for official, important or holy things, being critical of what is generally accepted, even to a point of being satiric. It is also often associated with comedic elements. The irreverent undermines what society normally embraces, which is tied in with subversion. The Gothic weakens or destroys the power and influences of existing systems.'PIB' ( 'Puss-In-Boots') serves as a social critique, presenting a cynical feline's point of view on human love and desire in a light-hearted rendition, offering humorous insights on sexuality.
There are a few instances where the irreverent had taken place. The master is completely immersed in his love for the beautiful Missus to the extent that he's worshipping her. On p174, " she is the divinity he's come to worship." This is blasphemous and irreverent as he is clearly defying the system of religion, committing a grave sin by worshipping anything else but God.
The Gothic shows the subversion of religious system in which females are treated as divine beings, even to the point of being "worshipped" due to the power of their sexual appeal. Carter might be trying to depict the greatness of the female sexuality through this irreverence.
Next is the sexual relationship the master had with the Missus. Firstly, the Missus commits adultery, which is sinful and frowned upon greatly in the society. Carter portrays their sexual encounter as an exhilarating experience where they "dance(d)"(p179) and had "sweet choked mutterings" that were "enough to melt the thorniest heart" (p180). There is a subversion of the expectation of a married woman, that is, to stay loyal but the missus goes against these conventions carved by the society. By having such a character, Carter presses on the idea to abandon society's expectations and fulfill one's desir