Twains A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthurs Court

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

King Arthur becomes the butt of Mark Twain’s satire in “A Connecticut
Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.”As Twain often does, his vision of life in
King Arthur’s court is quite different than the life that Thomas Mallory
presents in “Le Morte D’Arthur.”This paper will examine how Twain depicts
King Arthur as an individual that comes across as nothing more than
In contrast to Arthur’s court, in “Le Morte D’Arthur,” Hank sees a very
different court life.Mallory’s King Arthur is always seen with nobility
and respect.On the other hand, Hank notices the stark contrast between
classes.The king is presented as a man who revels in storytelling and
apparently believes every story he is ever told.While the starving
peasants wore tattered clothing, Arthur’s Round Table was:
as large as a circus ring; and around it sat a great company of men
dressed in such various and splendid colors that it hurt one’s eyes
to look at them.They wore their plumed hats, right along, except
that whenever one addressed himself directly to the king, he lifted
his hat a trifle just as he was beginning his remark” (Twain 25).
This scene leaves us with the impression that the aristocracy is arrogant
and mindless of the ordinary citizens.Hank tells us that he “knew that
the highest andfirst ladies and gentlemen in England had remained little
or no cleaner in their talk, and in the morals and conduct which such talk
implies, clear up to a hundred years ago” (34).Additionally, we learn
that no one in the country can read except a “few dozen priests” (48).We
can definitely see how the higher classes deprived the lower classes of
many things that we consider absolutely essential for modern life.
Interestingly, Hank likes the king regardless of his lack of refinery.
He tells us, “Well, I liked the king, and as king I respected him–
respected the office; at least r…