The Scarlet Letter – The Goals of Life

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Take a creepy old mad man, and a reverend who won't confess his devil-like sin, mix in a little psychology, and mind games, and you get The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne. As this story goes, Hester Prynne has committed an evil sin, and must wear a red "A" on her chest for the rest of her life. Later, Hawthorne introduces her husband, Roger Chillingworth who finds out about her evil sin, and is ready to take revenge to the person who committed this act of adultery. Then, we find the town's minister, Dimmesdale, in a poor state of being, so Chillingworth becomes his doctor, and soon finds out that his real ailment is that he's committed a sin. The mind games between Dimmesdale and Chillingworth continue, until Dimmesdale steps up, and admits his sin. On that spot, Dimmesdale dies. The most fascinating part of the book is the time in which Chillingworth is playing mind games with Dimmesdale. Even more fascinating are the characters themselves. While it seems that Dimmesdale and Chillingworth are two separate characters, both with different goals, they have several things in common with each other.
Dimmesdale and Chillingworth are two different, yet interesting characters. Dimmesdale is a younger reverend of the town that everyone looks up to. Also, "Dimmesdale… [is like] a coward" (Kestner, 2), because of his weakness against confessing his sin, and "his guilt, his prison, festered inside him until he started to physically deteriorate" (Kestner, 2). On the other hand, Chillingworth was Dimmesdale's physician, and had a remarkable way of healing people. Even though he could have used his healing powers for good, throughout the book, Chillingworth is described by the townspeople, and Hester's daughter, Pearl as the "black man" (the devil), and that Chillingworth is plotting against Dimmesdale. "Hawthorne makes Chillingworth out to be a monster" (Brayton…