The heights vs the grange

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Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange represent, respectively, uncivilized and civilized, or turbulent and serene. Accordingly, so are the residents of these houses and consequently, the attitudes of the places reflect the people. Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, is a novel of duality, of opposites unable to overcome their differences. Bronte describes Wuthering Heights as a harsh, cold house, with "grotesque carvings" (10) and she depicts it as having a "pervading spirit of neglect" (10). Not surprisingly name of the residence is symbolic of its nature, " 'Wuthering' being a significant provincial adjective, descriptive of the atmospheric tumult to which its station is exposed in stormy weather" (10), which is a foreshadowing of evil to come. Even the vegetation is lifeless and bleak, "a few stunted firs at the end of the house" (10), and "a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun" (10), vividly conjuring images of the darkness and wildness of the house. Accordingly, the people who inhabit the house tend to be brutal and turbulent as well. Pointedly, Heathcliff, who spends his entire existence plotting revenge on other people. Heathcliff is described as a "dirty, ragged, black haired child" (41) when Mr. Earnshaw brings him home for thefirst time, and even Mr. Lockwood describes him as a "dark-skinned gypsy in aspect" (11), which fits with the darkness of the house
It is fitting to say that Heathcliff influences the negativity of the Heights to a great extent. The early generation Earnshaws are relatively happy before the arrival of Heathcliff whose presence is favoured over that of the true Earnshaw children by old Mr Earnshaw. A jealousy arises in Hindley who inflicts intense abuse on Heathcliff when he inherits the role of head of the Heights. Such treatment leads to conflicts in the home and…