Rear Window

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Watching movies is what I do best, but all this time I have never watched anything so thrilling, tense and amazingly significant as an Alfred Hitchcock movie. His greatest film…”Rear Window” is probably Alfred Hitchcock's most perfectly constructed film. It takes place during four days, from Wednesday to Saturday, and the events are filmed from the window of one apartment and mostly through the eyes of one person – the magazine photographer L.B. Jeffries (James Stewart), confined to a wheelchair with his leg in plaster.
One of my goals is to describe to you what I understood and loved about this movie, because Sometimes you see or hear things that make a huge impact to where you think about it hours after it’s over. This is the case with Rear Window. What is it that makes Rear Window such a great movie? Let me count the ways.
First of all, is the obvious. Rear Window is by the greatest director who ever lived ;Alfred Hitchcock;. He was a master of suspense without using profanity, gore, nudity, or even graphic violence. He scared us with only a camera and some lights. The suspense in the film is based on the unquestionable logic of terror. The terror is not in the scene projected on the screen, but in the minds of the audience. Hitchcock slowly awakens in the audience a stream of suspense, which he dams until the final cataractous release. Hitchcock planned his film so accurately that after it had been edited, only a few dozen meters of film remained on the cutting room floor. This shows how amazing he was in directing, and how well the editor did his job. He shows the murderer creeping up the stairs to Jeff;s flat leaving the unfamiliar rear of the building into the audience;s imagination and it is just the unfamiliar rear that maximizes the threat: at this stage the threat is not just the rather pathetic Mr. Thorwald, but the complex unfamiliarity of the building itself. As for the knowledge of the door…