Racism in Adventures of Huckle

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Racism in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
During the Antebellum period of American history and for decades after, authors
often wrote works regarding the tragedies of slavery.Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,
written by Mark Twain, is one of the most famous works of literature dealing with the
issue of slavery.Unfortunately, some claim that Twain's writings are "offensive to black
readers, perpetuates cheap slave era stereotypes, and deserves no place on today's
bookshelves" (Salwen 1).This workreflects a boy's struggle dealing with slavery while
growing up in the South during the era of slavery.In fact, "the style of the book, which is
the style of Huck, is what makes it a far more convincing indictment of slavery than the
sensationalist propaganda of Uncle Tom's Cabin" (Eliot 64).Furthermore, "Huck Finn
savages racism as thoroughly as any document in American history" (Morrow 159).
However, "Attempts have been made to deprive children of the right to read Adventures
of Huckleberry Finn on the grounds that it is a racist tract" (Morrow 155).Twain's
controversial usage of literary devices such as the vernacular of the time period and
various speeches by the characters has raised many issues as to the worth of the work
itself. Teaching Adventures of Huckleberry Finn can surely open students' eyes to the
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of the deepest stories written on slavery.
The main question that arises from readers and critics alike is "What is the book really
about?" (Salwen 1)This question is one that the reader will have to answer for himself
after reading the novel.As with any good work of literature, there always remains a range
of interpretation that is still correct though it may differ from other readers.T. S. Eliot
commented on Twain's writings stating that he wrote "w…