pride and prejudice

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In Pride & Prejudice, two main issues are evident in the story. Thefirst and main one, pride and prejudice, also gives the book its name, and love and marriage.
In the book, Elizabeth and Mr Darcy both help to create an aura of misunderstandings between them. Not only a twenty- first century reader, but also a nineteenth century reader could have pointed out just how undesirable this situation is.
Austen wrote her fabricated her book around one simple moral, "never judge a book by its cover". Put aside your pride and prejudices, and get to know a person before judging them. To the twenty- first century reader, he or she would here this phrase often. In her time, Jane Austen was probably a pioneer in the idea of not being judgmental, but in the twenty- first century, the idea has been overused. It no longer makes for an interesting story line. So it is not this moral that makes pride and prejudice still popular with a modern audience.
The book, summed up, is your typical love story. Guy meets girl, girl misunderstands guy and hates him, guy proves himself to the girl, girl falls head over heels for boy. Guy and girl fall in love and want to get married. In that period in time, reasons for marriages were wealth, convenience, and most uncommonly, love. The opening sentence of Pride and Prejudice states, “It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.” In the 19th century, women usually only wanted to marry men if they were rich. This was the guys’ way of getting a wife, if they were fortunate enough. As Mrs. Bennet says, “If I can see one of my daughters happily settled at Netherfield…and the others equally married, I shall have nothing to wish for.” One easily realizes how obsessed Mrs. Bennet is with having rich son-in-laws. All that matters to her is having her daughters married to wealthy men.
Jane Austen did not believe in marrying for m