Othello: Are Desdemona and Othello truly in love

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When two people are in love, there is almost nothing that can break it. A relationship between two people can be tested, but in the end, their love is forever. In the book Othello, Desdemona and Othello have a relationship that is indestructible. Their love for one another is tested with great destruction, but the affection for each other survives in the end.
Othello and Desdemona have a genuine and honest love for each other throughout the entire play. Desdemona and Othello show their affection for each other regardless of racial and cultural differences. In thefirst half of the book, they believe and reassure others that their love is real and no one else's opinion can affect this. In the second half of the book, Iago's cunning acts start to test Othello's feelings for Desdemona. Othello becomes enraged with jealousy, but Iago does not create it, but only influences it. His jealousy is derived from his sincere love for Desdemona, for he does not know how to handle the news that Desdemona may no longer love him the way that he loves her.
When Brabantio discovers that Othello and Desdemona may have been married, he is very agitated that his daughter may have wed to a moor (a black man). When Brabantio confronts Othello to hear his story, Othello says to Brabantio, "And bade me, if I had a friend that loved her, I should but teach him how to tell my story, and that would woo her. Upon this hint I spoke. She loved me for the dangers I had passed, and I loved her that she did pity them. This only is the witchcraft I have used. Here comes the lady. Let her witness." (1.3.163, Othello) When Othello says this to Brabantio, he tells him that he did not force himself or mentally possess her, but their love is real and ordinary. If Brabantio still feels that it is unethical, Othello apologizes that he feels this way. Othello insists that he can question Desdemona all he wants, but the two will be in unison in…