Medea

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The story of Jason and Medea is a classic myth of love and betrayal. Medea, a princess and priestess of Colchis, falls in love with a foreigner, Jason, who has come to steal her country’s most sacred religious symbol, a Golden Fleece. Because of her desire for Jason, Medea helps him take the fleece, and in return Jason promises to marry her. As they flee the country, Medea kills her brother and scatters pieces of his corpse behind her, slowing the king down as he and his army chase after her. After they leave Colchis, Jason and Medea go to Iolcus, where Jason was promised the throne by his uncle, King Pelias, if he returned with the Golden Fleece. Pelias breaks his promise, and Jason is refused the throne. Medea goes to see Jason’s father, and gives him a potion which restores youth. Pelias’ daughters, upon seeing Jason’s restored father, ask Medea to give the potion to the king as well. Medea, hoping to help Jason, tricks Pelias’ daughters into killing Pelias instead. Jason and Medea are then exiled and flee to Corinth, where Jason, with the excuse of hoping to improve their status, agrees to marry the princess of Corinth. Upon hearing of Jason’s betrayal, Medea threatens the lives of both the king and his daughter in her rage. The king, hearing news of this, exiles Medea and her children. Hoping to get her final revenge, Medea poisons a beautiful gown and headdress and sends them with her children as gifts to the princess and requests that she allow the children to stay in Corinth with their father. The princess accepts the gifts and puts them on, which causes her to burst into flames. The king, upon seeing his daughter’s body, throws himself on it in anguish, and bursts into flames as well. When the children, who had been sent back to their mother after giving the gifts, return home, Medea stabs each one, killing them as her final revenge on Jason (Euripides, 56-114).
To analyze Medea’s motivation for killing her children would n…

Medea

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It has long been debated whether in the play "Medea," Medea was attempting vengeance or justice on Jason.In order to have this argument, you mustfirst find out what vengeance is and what justice is.Vengeance is the act of revenge, getting back someone who has wronged you.Justice is fairness, the act of setting something or someone equal.Therefore, the real argument is whether Jason has committed more wrongs to Medea than Medea has committed against him.
It is true, of course, that Medea had done many things for Jason.Medea explained all this when she said, "I cheated my father for you and tame the fire-breathing Brazen-hoofed bulls; I saved your life in the field of teeth…. I poisoned the great serpent and got you the Golden Fleece; and fled with you, and killed my brother when he pursued us, making myself abominable in my own home; and then in yours I got your enemy Pelias hacked to death by his own daughters' hands….. My rapid and tricky wisdom: you it has served, You it has served well: here are five times." (Medea 255)However, Jason has done many things for Medea's benefit.Jason explains, "…. I carried you out of the dirt and superstition of Asiatic Colchis into the rational sunlight of Greece, and the marble music of the Greek temples….. I have brought you to meet thefirst minds of our time, and to speak as an equal with the great heroes and the rulers of the cities…" (Medea 256)Jason has offered Mede!
a a good life, one which she could have lived happily with her children in Greece.But Medea let her hatred for Jason get in the way of her life.She time and time again insulted Creon and brought exile onto herself.Jason explained, "You have once more affronted and insulted the head of Corinth.This is not thefirst time.I've seen what a fool anger is.You might have lived here happily, secured and honored….. by being just a little de…