Lord of the Flies Symbols, characters allegory

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Golding deftly forges two leaders amongst the boys, Ralph and Jack. The two are the respective island equivalents of a democratic president and a communist premier. Jack and Ralph frequently take contrary positions; slowly, creating two distinct tribes as their personal animosity increases. Early in the novel the allocation of power is thefirst key issue of confrontation upon which the two figures distinguish themselves. The stranded boys revert back to their inherited customs and call for an election of a chief. Jack, much in the fashion of a power hungry dictator, attempts to seize power. "I ought to be chief, because I'm chapter chorister and head boy." (22) Golding quickly foreshadows Jack's totalitarian control over his subjects, "'All right who wants Jack for Chief?' With dreary obedience the choir raised their hands." (22) Jack's counterpart, Ralph, is elected by an overwhelming majority. Instead of attempting to impress his will upon others, Ralph democratically delegates, exercising the consent given to him by the electorate. "You voted me for chief. Now you do what I say." (81) Unlike Jack, Ralph does not horde power, he honors the democratic rights of free speech and freedom of expression. He establishes the rules of popular debate during meetings. "We can't have everyone talking at once. We'll have to have'Hands up' like at school…I'll give the conch to the next person to speak. He can hold it when he's speaking." (33) Oppositely Jack in many scenes is portrayed as prying, or attempting to snatch the conch away from orators, and especially so from Piggy. This repetitive action of Jack draws close parallels to soviet suppression of voice; Piggy represents intellectuals, such as Golding himself, the victims of zealous communistic repression.
When finally the opposite poles of Jack and Ralph repel too greatly for reconcilia…