Lord of the Flies

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Ralph is a twelve-year-old boy marooned with a group of other boys on a deserted island. He is the athletic and charismatic character of Lord of the Flies. Ralph was elected the leader of the boys at the beginning of the novel and is the primary representative of order, civilization, and productive leadership in the novel. While most of the other boys are concerned with playing, having fun, and avoiding work at the beginning, Ralph starts with building huts and thinking of ways to increase their chances of being rescued. For this reason, Ralph’s power and influence over the other boys are extremely secure at the beginning of the novel.
However, as the book develops and the group succumbs to savage instincts, Ralph’s position declines abruptly as Jack’s station rises. Eventually, all the boys except Piggy leave Ralph’s group for Jack’s, and Ralph is left alone to be hunted by Jack’s tribe. Ralph never seriously considers joining Jack’s tribe in order to save himself.
Ralph’s commitment to civilization and morality is very strong, and his main wish is to be rescued and returned to the society of adults. In a sense, this strength gives Ralph a moral victory at the end of the novel; when he casts the Lord of the Flies to the ground and takes up the stake it is impaled on to defend himself against Jack’s hunters. Ralph understands, as Simon did, that savagery exists within all the boys, but he is determined not to let it overwhelm him.
For much of the novel, Ralph is simply unable to understand why the other boys would give in to base instincts of bloodlust and barbarism. The sight of the hunters chanting and dancing is baffling and distasteful to him. But when Ralph hunts a boar for thefirst time, he experiences the exhilaration and thrill of bloodlust and violence, and when he attends Jack’s feast, he is swept away by the frenzy, dancing on the edge of the group and participating in the killing of Simon. Thisfir