indians and alcohol

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Peter C. Mancall, Deadly Medicine; Indians and Alcohol in Early America. (Ithaca and
London: Cornell University Press, Inc., 1997).
Peter C. Mancall is currently a Professor of History at the University of Kansas.He attended Harvard College and received his Ph. D. in history in 1986. He received the W.T. Kemper Prize Fellowship for teaching excellence in 1998, the inaugural Research Fellowship awarded by the Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand in 1998, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for 2001-2002.He has written many books on the subject of early America and its interaction with the Native American population.He is also the advisory editor for Native American History at Routledge, and serves on the editorial board of Reviews in American History.His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the NEH, the Library Company of Philadelphia, the AHA, and the American Philosophical Society.
This book covered the affects of alcohol on the culture, lives, and future of the Native American population.Mancall got his information on this subject from documentation of missionaries, trading posts, and courts of the time.As most of the information came from the white man records most of the book was a little fact driven.Even so the majority of the facts showed the devastating effects that alcohol had on the Native American population.It also includes information on the trading of alcohol.As well as the early temperance movement the early missionaries and their Christian converted Native Americans started.
Mancall used a myriad of resources, which made one believe the facts and details that he put forth.However this also tended to give him somewhat of an impersonal view to the subject.While an even more important question is raised during this discussion, as to why the white man himself did not seem to face the same problem with drinking as the Native Ameri…