Huckleberry Finn

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An adolescent's view and attitude toward life is greatly influenced by the earlier stages of their life. An unknown philosopher once emphasized the significance of environment in a young person's upbringing. In his novel the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain illicitly sustains this man's observation. Though both are young, thrill seeking, and scheming boys, Twain deftly inculcates essential distinctions of character in Tom and Huck due to their childhood nurturing.
Huckleberry Finn has been raised in shortcoming conditions; living in an indecent, oppressed, and meager situation impels Huck to seek an egress. His egress is to merely find pleasure and happiness, which is inadvertently barred by the widow in her attempts to "sivilize" Huck. Huck attempted to flee because he could no longer bear "how dismal and regular in widow was in all her ways" (71). Being raised in an environment with a violent, destitute, drunk as his only parent, Huck had grown familiarized to a lifestyle without rules, regulations, and confinement. The widow dressed Huck in nice clothing, prohibited his smoking, took him to church, and put him in school estranged Huck, who only favored an uncomplicated and effortless way of life. Huck's childhood poverty-stricken lifestyle also influenced how he manages his funds and assets. On an adventure with Tom Sawyer, Huck had obtained a fortune of $6000, which he leaves in the safe hands of Judge Thatcher to manage as it ensues interest. Huck, unlike most boys who would eagerly squander their fortune, has learned the lesson of the value of money. And although Huck enjoys embarking on new and exciting adventures, he does not enjoy prolonging their endurance. He desired a swift escape from the widow's attempts to "sivilize" him, and he also preferred a short duration of each of the Duke and Dauphin's plots and deceptions. In the end of the novel, Huck says …