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In thefirst three paragraphs of chapter three in Great Expectations, Charles Dickens uses mostly similies to present a mood of extreme guilt and fear of being caught, but also a little personification is used to describe the dampness.
The diction that Dickens chose to use mainly consists of repitition of certain words, which brings more emphasis to the word itself, and the word itself establishes the mood and also the tone.The repitition of the word “round” is used for a particular purpose. “One black ox, with a white cravat on…fixed me so obstinately with his eyes, and moved his blunt head round in such an accusatory manner as I moved round, that I blubbered out to him, ‘I couldn’t help it, sir! It wasn’t for myself I took it!’ ” Round means circular, and when you circle someone you are singling them out. Pip feels that the ox is singling him out as a thief, and, not realizing the ox doesn’t know what he has done, he responds with his excuse. In paragraph three, Pip states, “…I couldn’t warm my feet, to which the damp cold seemed riveted, as the iron was riveted to the leg of the man I was running to meet.” Dickens chose to repeat the word riveted in order to set up an analogy between Pip’s cold feet and the prisoner’s iron shackes. The two are similar because they bothhinder movement, though neither are successful.
Dickens used figurative language in the form of similies to convey the tone and mood by comparing Pip’s thoughts and feelings to what is happening in actuality. Feeling guilty and afraid, Pip exclaims, “The gates and dikes and banks came bursting at me through the mist, as if they cried as plainly as could be, ‘A boy with somebody else’s pork pie! Stop him!’ ” This simile shows that Pip thinks in his mind that he’ll get caught for sure. He imagines that the shapes appearing through the fog as he gets near enough to see them are denouncing him a thief and calling authorities to the area. In thefirst paragr…