Critique on film reviews of James Cameron

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The focus of my film review project for this term is the James Cameron's 1984 classic, The Terminator. Not surprisingly there was a surplus of original movie reviews out for this film, unlike the previous terms assignment when there was only the Variety and New York Times original reviews. In addition to film reviews from Variety and The New York Times, there are also reviews from Films in Review, The Los Angeles Times, Monthly Film Bulletin, New Statesman, New York Post, Newsday, and Village Voice. As film continued to grow and evolve, so did the media responsible for following it. The reviews are appropriately diverse in what they have to say about the film and there is a large range of opinions on almost all aspects of the film. The phrase, "you can't please everybody" is very fitting for reviews of The Terminator.
The one common vein in the reviews of The Terminator, is that they all found the special effects to be a strong point in the film, although some reviews placed more emphasis on it than others. The Variety and Monthly Film Bulletin, reviews specifically mention the stellar job and overall creativity of Stan Winston, whose specialty on set was for "special Terminator effects". The New York Post, and New York Times reviews also make special mention of the special effects job done on Schwarzenegger as the Terminator in the film, although without directly referencing the work of Stan Winston. Very overlooked in the tributes to the special effects though are the contributions of art director George Costello who was responsible for the creation of different environments in the film. The Monthly Film Bulletin states, "Art director George Costello works wonders, on Los Angeles converting a downtown restaurant into the new-wave nightclub, Tech Noir (an excellent description, incidentally, of the film's whole style), and a deserted steel mill into a police station, a run-down motel and the s…