Character of Technique

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Influence of Orson Wells; Citizen Kane.
There’s no kidding the genius of the perhaps the greatest inovator of
modern film: Orson Welles. Accomplishing in his early twenties what only a few
have in their lives, this bright young star promised to alter hollywood roots
forever. After working his way into a movie deal with RKO Studios, Welles
created his most recognized 1941 masterpiece, Citizen Kane.Kane not only
won the 1941 Oscor for best Film, but Orson shattered all kinds of molds with his
controversial writing, his experimental directing, and his disturbingly convincing
role as the media mogul Charles Foster Kane. Fifty years later, Citizen Kane is
universally accepted as the greatest American Film ever made.
Growing up, Orson Welles produced, directed, and starred in his own
brilliant projects. Citizen Kane was no different. Implementing ceilings into the
shot enlightened mise-on-scen and took realism to a whole new level.
Complimenting the depth of the screen is Orson’s amazing use of the long take.
This encorporates a single camera shot lasting longer than one minute. After
one viewing, this auther counted thirty-five uses of the long take in this 119
minute masterpiece. There is one scene towards the end of the film portraying
Kane in his elder, darker years. The take begins in a room inside Xanadu, Kanes
multi-million dollar estate, where Susan Alexander leaves the disturbed Kane for
good. It continues with Kane smashing up the room. He then leaves the room
and walkes passed his confused staff of waiters, butlers, and door men into a
mirrored hallway. The camera work is so suddle yet so effective, it literally
speaks to you without words. The long shot not only displays the sleakness of
the film, it avoids over-editing, providing room for brilliant dialogue.
Welles also demonstrates his prestigious stan