“Saplings in the Storm”

Words like “dramatic,” chaos,” and “shattered” show the writer’s mood as serious, sad, and slightly dark. She uses heavy descriptions when describing how the girls feel and change. Her tone depicts the readiness of what the young girls deal with, and how it affects the people around them. Piper’s tone in “Saplings in the Storm” is enough to make her readers think about what some adolescent girls might be hiding under the surface. Personally this topic about the problems surfacing in adolescent girls not only made sense to me, but also surprised me.

I had a lot of different, eave things going on in my life around the ages of twelve to fifteen, so the changes brought on by adolescence did not bother me as much as it seems to have bothered the girls in the “Saplings in a Storm” essay. I was facing problems much larger than anxiety, self-image, and confidence. I could and can easily see how adolescence has affected my friends and the people around me, but I don’t remember experiencing the same types of problems that the girls in the essay are.

Even though I haven’t faced similar problems at the same time as these there girls, I would never venture to say that I have not faced them at all. Mary Piper successfully portrays how reaching adolescence generally affects girls. Her tone in the writing along with the figurative language makes the changes more real to the reader. She delivers her thoughts and concerns affectively through her continual attitude about the subject. Even though adolescence did not affect me the way it does for others; after reading this essay I now know that adolescence is connected to the way girls act at a certain age.