Reliability of Nick Carraway as the narrator

A secondary source (lacking information) Nick is unreliable because: The beginning: Nick describes how he deals with the bores at his college by saying that he ‘frequently feigned sleep, preoccupations or a hostile levity. ” (5) Pretending to be sleeping, busy or irritated to avoid them is a dishonest act on Nick’s part. Dishonest and intolerant. When Nick is referring to Other young men he says: “the intimate revelations of young men or at least the terms in Which they express them are usually plagiarist’s and marred With obvious suppressions. ” (6).

This hints, that Nick’s story, as he is a young man himself, is plagiarist’s, meaning borrowed from Other characters and isn’t first- and information. “Marred with obvious suppressions”, suggests that he isn’t telling the whole truth. Dishonest/Liar False claims about himself/family: Although Nick claims that his family, “have been prominent, well-to-do people in the middle-western town for three generations. ” (7), he then reveals that his father can only support him for 1 year and he dismisses rumors about his engagement by claiming that he’s too poor to be getting married.

He also claims he’s from Scottish nobility, yet his grandfathers brother left his country and immigrated to America and sent a substitute to war (not noble or patriotic). Nick says about himself: “l am one of the few honest people I have known,” (64), this doesn’t make him more trustworthy, but in fact makes us wary footnoting him. He cannot give accurate information about what happened between Gatsby and Daisy before his involvement in the story – instead we find out information, which Nick lacks through his conversations with other characters, such as: Jordan Baker and Gatsby.

Gatsby is known for being dishonest, even about his real name and Jordan is “incurably according to Nick himself, so we can’t really trust the information presented. Secondary source Nick hasn’t had a meaningful and long conversation With Daisy, all the information Hess gathered about her are second-hand from Gatsby (Who loves Daisy) and Jordan (Who has questionable integrity) so he has no way of explaining or rationalizing her actions, her motives or feelings. Resource Nick is too involved in most events and relationships in the book, Which makes him bias. Nick is bias towards Gatsby throughout the story, although he should’ve been impartial and objective. Nick called all the other upper class characters (Daisy, Tom, Jordan__) “a rotten crowd”, meaning morally rotten and Gatsby is ‘Worth the whole damn bunch put together (160). This proves that Nick thinks more highly of Gatsby than of the other characters Bias, specifically towards Gatsby.

Nick is very sympathetic towards Gatsby, because he is the underdog who hasn’t had the same advantages and privileges as the rest Of the characters, and has had a very rough upbringing (in the beginning of the Story Nick tells us Of how his father taught him not be judgmental Of people who haven’t had the same advantages as others). This also makes us question Nick’s judgment because he believe he has put he has followed through With is father advice, yet his actions indicate otherwise. Gatsby claims that he’s from a wealthy family from the Mid. Est., that he went to oxford and that his parents are dead. When Nick asks Gatsby which part in the Midwest, he answers “San Francisco”, Nick responds by saying “l see” (70). Nick doesn’t questions Gatsby claims, although its abundantly clear Hess lying ( San Francisco isn’t in the Midwest). Nick meets his father, Henry Gate, before the funeral and finds out he’s not dead or wealthy as Gatsby claims, yet despite this, Nick lies to Henry and says: “He never told me definitely that his parent were dead. (172). To Gatsby lies Nick is a liar.