Characterization of Atticus Finch

The characterization of Tactics finch is definitely more accurate in Malcolm Gladden’s “The Courthouse Ring: Tactics Pinch and the Limits of Southern Liberalism” than in Harper Lees To Kill a Mockingbird. The way Harper Lee depicts Tactics makes him seem unrealistic, while Gladden’s interpretation has more evidence behind it and seems more accurate. Gladden’s interpretation of Tactics reveals the unrealistic world he lives in, the weakness in his court case, and his discriminating standards.

These are some of the many reasons why Gladden’s interpretation Of Tactics Finch is more accurate. The first reason Gladden’s interpretation of Tactics Finch is more accurate than Lee’s version is the fact that throughout the story Tactics seems to be living in a fantasy world. During the scene where Tactics tells Scout about Walter Cunningham and the lynch mob, Caldwell points out that despite Walters homicidal hatred for black people”, Tactics believes that he is just in a blind spot along with the rest of us.

Tactics is trying to live in the fantasy that Walter is a good man, even though attempted to kill a man because of the color of his skin. In another scene Tactics tells Scout about the UK Klux Klan just being a political organization that went away because of a person named Sam Levy making them ashamed of themselves (Lee). He does not want to deal with the existence to anti- Semitism, but wants to live in the fantasy of Mr.. Levy giving them a good scolding and scaring them away (Caldwell).

Another reason Gladden’s interpretation of Tactics Finch’s character is more accurate than Lee’s version is how Tactics weakly defends Tom Robinson in court. Attic’s best defense for Tom was that he could not of hit Male Lowell because he only has a right arm and the bruises on Amylase’s face ever on the right side of her face (Lee). This is not a strong point due to the fact that Tom could have easily struck Male with her head turned or with a backhand motion. Tactics also tries to use the desperate “she wanted it” defense as 3 last Straw against Male, saying she wanted to have sex with Tom (Caldwell).

This was a harsh accusation that was seen as a despicable act; it was thought that no Whet woman would ever consensually have sex with a black man. The final reason why Gladden’s interpretation of Tactics Finch is more accurate than Lee’s version is the fact that Mr.. Finch has contradicting morals, which Lee does not seem to point out but Caldwell does. Atone point in the story, Tactics tells Scout and Gem that it is a sin to kill a mockingbird, symbolizing not to harm or take away from the innocent (Lee).

Lee points out how Tactics shows his sensitivity and moral tranquility by teaching his kids not to disturb the innocent, implying people like accused rapist Tom Robinson and neighborhood freak show go Raddled who have been tormented by their society. Toward the end of the story, Boo Raddled saves Scout and Gem trot bib Lowell and Tactics asks Scout to change her story for the sake of protecting Boo. Caldwell points out how Tactics wants to obstruct justice to prevent Boo Raddled from being showered with gifts for his heroism (Caldwell).

Why is he going against his previous belief that it is a sin to kill a mockingbird by taking away the praise 800 would have received? El?s interpretation of Tactics Pinch is inaccurate due to the way Tactics fails to accept reality, defend Tom Robinson, and follow his morals. Caldwell on the other hand points out these faults and provides strong evidence proving Tactics is not the perfect man Lee depicts him as. As a result, it is very evident that the characterization Of Tactics Finch is far more accurate in Gladden’s interpretation than in Lees.