A Cool Paper Essay Research Paper Hamlet

A Cool Paper Essay, Research Paper

Hamlet: Madman or Misunderstood Shakespeare’s tragic hero, Hamlet, and his sanity can arguably be discussed. Many aspects of the play support his loss of control in his actions, while other parts uphold his ability of dramatic art. The issue can be discussed both ways and altogether provide significant support to either theory. Throughout the play, there are indications from Hamlet that question his mind’s well being. Hamlet’s mood changes abruptly throughout the play. Hamlet appears to act mad when he hears of his father’s murder. At the time he speaks “wild and whirling” words when he says, “Why, right, you are in the right. And so, without more circumstance at all, I hold it fit that we shake hands and part…” (Act I, scene V, lines 132-139). It seems as if there are two Hamlets in the play, one that is a “sensitive and ideal prince, and insane madman, who from an outburst of passion and rage slays Polonius with no feeling of remorse (Wallace). After Hamlet kills Polonius he will not tell anyone where the body is. Instead, he assumes his ironic state, which others perceive as madness. “Not where he eats, but where ?a is eaten. A certain convocation of political worms a e’en at him.” (Act IV, scene III, lines 20-21) Hamlet’s behavior throughout the play, especially towards Ophelia, is inconsistent. He jumps into Ophelia’s grave, and fights with Laertes in her grave. During the fight with Laertes in Ophelia’s grave, Hamlet professed how much he loved her when he said, “Forty thousand brothers could not, with all their quantity of love, make up my sum” [Act V, scene I, lines 272- 274). However, Hamlet told her that he never loved her when she returned his letters and gifts while she was still alive. Hamlet subtly hints his awareness

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Hamlet: Madman or Misunderstood Shakespeare’s tragic hero, Hamlet, and his sanity can arguably be discussed. Many aspects of the play support his loss of control in his actions, while other parts uphold his ability of dramatic art. The issue can be discussed both ways and altogether provide significant support to either theory. Throughout the play, there are indications from Hamlet that question his mind’s well being. Hamlet’s mood changes abruptly throughout the play. Hamlet appears to act mad when he hears of his father’s murder. At the time he speaks “wild and whirling” words when he says, “Why, right, you are in the right. And so, without more circumstance at all, I hold it fit that we shake hands and part…” (Act I, scene V, lines 132-139). It seems as if there are two Hamlets in the play, one that is a “sensitive and ideal prince, and insane madman, who from an outburst of passion and rage slays Polonius with no feeling of remorse (Wallace). After Hamlet kills Polonius he will not tell anyone where the body is. Instead, he assumes his ironic state, which others perceive as madness. “Not where he eats, but where ?a is eaten. A certain convocation of political worms a e’en at him.” (Act IV, scene III, lines 20-21) Hamlet’s behavior throughout the play, especially towards Ophelia, is inconsistent. He jumps into Ophelia’s grave, and fights with Laertes in her grave. During the fight with Laertes in Ophelia’s grave, Hamlet professed how much he loved her when he said, “Forty thousand brothers could not, with all their quantity of love, make up my sum” [Act V, scene I, lines 272- 274). However, Hamlet told her that he never loved her when she returned his letters and gifts while she was still alive. Hamlet subtly hints his awareness