The Fall of Richard Nixon

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Richard Nixonfirst came in to Politics as very intelligent man, whose background was very respectable and humble. He graduated second in his class from Whittier College in 1934 and went on to Duke Law School. Hisfirst political involvement was when he returned from World War II (Aitken 5). Nixon decided to answer a call for someone to run against the five-term Democratic Congressman, Jerry Voorhis. Nixon seemed the perfect man for the job, and he was welcomed generously by the California Republican party, who considered him “salable merchandise (Nixon 1)." He had a good political mind which made him renowned as a fierce anti-communist. He also went as far as to make phone calls to voters saying that voting for Nixon was the best move because Voorhis was a communist. As one see, his need to attempt to secure his position had been there from the early years under the political moonlight. Richard Nixon was a paranoid man whose personal insecurities ultimately led to his demise.
The tactic of straightforward accusations of communism was new at this time. The fear of the Soviet Union and its supporting communist powers was growing at a rapid pace. To bring about such an accusation at this time would cause the public to stay away from the indicted, which in this case
3 was Voorhis. "Of course I knew Jerry Voorhis wasn’t a communist,” Nixon later said, “but I had to win (Nixon 1).” This proves that Nixon was willing to do what ever it took to not only establish a secure position but to achieve it through a large margin.
There was another occurrence similar to this which involved Richard Nixon and a former advisor to Franklin D. Roosevelt, Alger Hiss. Nixon pursued this man closely. Nixon ferociously edged the case forward when Hiss was accused of "transmitting secret State Department files to the Soviets (Nixon 1)." His paranoia of facing competition for…