The Effect of Brown V. the Board of Education

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Martin Luther King Jr. stated in his famous "I have a dream" speech that, "I have a dream my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today! (3)King's speech set the tone for a civil change in the society especially in the school system.The law during this time period was in favor of white society and felt the need to separate whites from blacks in every public place in society.The public school was another realm where white parents wanted separation between their children and blacks.Brown v. the Board of Education (1954) was a vital case that overturned the custom of separate but equal that was established by the Plessy verse Ferguson case.
The Jim Crow laws were laws that enforced the separation of blacks and whites in society.Most all states in the south adopted the Jim Crow Laws.The issue of segregation wasfirst brought up in the case of Plessy verse Ferguson.In 1890, Homer Plessy violated the Louisiana state law of The Separate Car Act by sitting in the white car of the train.Plessy thought since he was seven-eights white he was able to sit in the white only cars but police officials disagreed and regarded him as a black male.(Hartin 1)Plessy's case was appealed all the way to the United States Supreme Court on the basis of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendment (Hartin 1).The justices of the United States Supreme Court ruled against Plessy on the grounds of separate but equal. The justices stated that The Fourteenth Amendment "could not have been intended to abolish distinctions based upon color, or to enforce social, as distinguished from political equality, or a commingling of the two races upon terms unsatisfactory to either" (Hartin 2). This code of separate but equal became the law of the land in the relationship between blacks and whites.Th…