Siddhartha

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Siddhartha had one single goal in life. His goal is to become empty, to become empty of thirst, desire, dreams, pleasure and sorrow – to let the Self die. No longer to be Self, to experience the peace of an emptied heart, to experience pure thought – that was his goal. When all the Self was conquered and dead, when all passions and desires were silent, then the last must awaken, the innermost of Being that is no longer Self – the great secret Siddhartha, according to his actions, was constantly in search for knowledge, regardless of what kind, or what he had to do to obtain it. In the book titled Siddhartha, by Herman Hesse, this is shown to us by Siddhartha’s leaving home to join the Samanas, and all the actions leading to his residence alongside the river.
Leaving his family and home everyone loved him, showed that Siddhartha not only knew what he wanted in life, but will do anything to attain it.Siddhartha did not leave his father’s chambers until he had gotten his way, until his father had submitted to Siddhartha’s wishes and agreed to let him leave home to join the Samanas. This stubbornness, this patience with people and situations is also a large part of Siddhartha’s character. It enables him to out wait anyone or anything, which teaches him how to do without and also helps him through his time with the Samanas. “Siddhartha learned a great deal from the Samanas he learned many ways of losing the Self”. Despite the new knowledge he acquired, Siddhartha realized that it was only ” . . . a temporary palliative against the pain and folly of life”. His next decision was to leave the Samanas and go in search of the Buddha in order to learn perhaps something he did not already know. Through this learned that Siddhartha, having !
all that is possible in one place, moves to another in search for more wisdom in search for the secret of how to obtain inner peace, how to find the Self. This action also shows his change by showing us t…

Siddhartha

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What do you get when you cross a novel with a spiritual guide to life? Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha. The book is the life story of a man who has one lofty goal: to become enlightened.
He was born the son of a Brahmin, a member of the highest social class. Yet he was unhappy with the teachings of the Brahmins, so instead of remaining one of them and becoming a priest, he became a wandering ascetic (a Samana), then a merchant, then a ferryman, seeking some sort of enlightenment every step of the way. Eventually, at the end of his life, he reached enlightenment, but only after a lifetime of diligently following divergent paths. Siddhartha had to take so many different paths in his life because he didn't really know what he was searching for.
His goal was enlightenment. But what is enlightenment? That was the question that he never asked himself. He was searching for something undefined, something that is indescribable.
He had a general idea of what it was, and he had a general idea of how to get it, but however hard he tried, whatever path he took, it never seemed to come any closer.
As a Brahmin, something was bothering him. He felt unfulfilled, like his life was empty. "The Brahmins…knew a tremendous number of things– but was it worth while knowing all these things if they did not know the one important thing, the only important thing?" He knew that he could not attain enlightenment as one of them, so he joined the Samanas, thinking that they were on the right path. But after three years with them, he was able to realize that they weren't going anywhere either. "I believe that amongst all the Samanas, probably not even one will attain Nirvana." He had heard rumors of a man who had become enlightened, and so he left the Samanas with his friend Govinda, and went to seek out Buddha, the enlightened one. There, he acknowledged Buddha's transcendence but disagreed with his teachings. He fe…