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In Caryll Churchill's collaborative drama "Cloud Nine," there are some very interesting resonances between acts one and two.As readers, we have to pay close attention to the gender and ethnic background's of the actors, and the significance of who they are portraying.Throughout this play, there are many roles that are filled with cast members who by society, do not seem like the perfect fit for their character.By using the doubling and cross-dressing methods of drama, Churchill is able to develop the gender, race, and sexuality themes of the play.
The doubling of Clive and Cathy forced the readers to pay attention to who the actors were, and the significance of the role they were playing.Clive is a father-type figure, who is also the most dominating character throughout all of Caryll Churchill's play.His roles as a father, husband, and government administrator allow the readers to see why he is the character with the most control.Clive shows his dominance over the other characters in lines 129-155, when he makes Joshua apologize for being rude to his wife Betty earlier in the day.This scene allows the readers to see that Clive can take over a situation and make his black servant Joshua, feel inferior even though he truly might not have been rude to Betty.Clive also shows his dominance over his wife Betty, when Mrs. Saunders comes to the house on horseback in lines 255 to 260.After saying a few words of admiration about Mrs. Saunders, Clive simply instructs his wife to take care of Mrs. Saunders by saying, "!
Mrs. Saunders has ridden here alone.What will you have for her?Tea or something stronger.Betty you will no what to do"(Churchill 813).When Clive says this, and Betty does not question the order she has just received from him.By Churchill having the actors accepting their roles, she has eliminated any conflict that might have been an issue if the actors had not accepted…

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Youth in Television have been portrayed in many different lights, anywhere from the criminal to the young at heart.With their resistance to the dominant culture, many studies have been done concerning the meaning of the political challenges to the social formation involving investigating cultural objects and media artifacts.Historically young people have fallen into distinct but dependent categories: youth-as-fun and youth-as-trouble.One might ask why any of this is pertinent to the study of television.However in the 1950’s consumer boom, youth-as-fun became a major advertising strategy.Once advertisers identified teenagers as a valuable consumer, more and more positive images of youth became evident on TV.Photography of youth has been historically produced out of ideological interests, constructed by new markets in an attempt to gain financial resources young people had gained access to.Even still today it is amazing to view how television views and portrays y!
outh for the benefit of making a sale.
Youth-as-trouble have been seen in most aspects of the factual media such as the nightly news.These shows have the major impact of building images, which in turn are taken as examples of how young working- class people generally behave.This leads to an ideological regime of images, which serve to naturalize the media construction of youth-as-trouble (51).”Images of youth-as-trouble are not only limited to news media, but can be seen in soap operas.British soap operas serve as a forum for raising important issues about social problems featuring teenagers with common problems.As keepers of normalcy and common sense, these programs serve ideological interests by bringing forms of power, i.e. the adult, to support the interests of the teenager’s bodies to be against teenage sex or acting out of control.By bringing power on the problem situations, adults on the programs are able to control the dominant ideas of …