Communism, National, Liberalism and the Outcome of World War I

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

The Treaty of Versailles was supposed to be a peace agreement between the
Allies and the Germans (Bailey, 1972). However, the treaty sparked
political discontent and economic chaos in Germany, as it represented the
results of hostility and revenge and opened the door for a dictatorship and
On November 11, 1918, World War I ended. Germany surrendered and signed an
armistice agreement, so the Allies were faced with the task of creating a
peace agreement (Bailey, 1972). In December of 1918, the Allies met in
Versailles. The main representatives at this meeting were Woodrow Wilson,
representing the United States, David Lloyd George, representing Great
Britain, David Lloyd George, and George Clemenceau, representing France.
While the task of drafting a peace agreement seemed relatively simple, it
soon became apparent that each country had conflicting ideas and motives
For example, President Wilson did not enter the war until it was absolutely
necessary, as he wanted the U.S. to remain neutral. During the war, Wilson
outlined his peace program, which was based on fourteen main points,
demanding that future agreements be open covenants of peace, openly arrived
at; an insistence upon absolute freedom of the seas; and the formation of a
general association of nations. The fourteen points were focused on peace
and set the groundwork for the armistice that Germany ultimately signed in
November 1918. While the U.S. was a major player in ending the war, Wilson
was still more interested in a “peace without victors” than seizing German
colonies or reparations. However, the European leaders did not agree with
Wilson’s ideas. It soon became clear that the European allies were seeking
revenge and wanted to cripple Germany both economically and socially.
Before the war, Germany challenged Britain’s powerful navy by drastically
increasing the funding for their navy. As a result, Britain absorbed thirty-