Colonialism in Two Narratives

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Capture and life with the Indians changed Mary Rowlandson.She would
never again take anything for granted, and she became much more spiritual
after her ordeal with the Indians.Her capture was a frightening nightmare
that ended with the reuniting of her family, but she nearly starved to
death before she returned, and she was treated little better than an animal
most of the time.Her story is a story of courage and devotion to God, and
it illustrates the underlying strength that lives in all of us.Rowlandson
discovered many things during her captivity – that she wanted to live, that
she dearly loved her family, and that she was a survivor.She also saw the
Indians as nothing but savages, even though they spared her life.She
wrote, “I was with the enemy eleven weeks and five days, and not one week
passed without the fury of the enemy, and some desolation by fire and sword
upon one place or other” (Rowlandson).Her captivity resulted from the
colonization of native lands, resulting in the revolution of the native
tribes, who resented the white man and their blind disregard for what the
Indians considered their own.It is difficult to blame the Indians for
fighting back, and while Rowlandson’s ordeal was certainly frightening and
horrible, her capture is simply a result of the Indians fighting for their
way of life and their culture, which would ultimately disappear as the
Zitkala-Sa’s narratives show the other side of the coin.She is a
Sioux woman who writes of her childhood, and a life and culture lost to the
colonialism of the white man in the Great Plains.Both ordeals are caused
by colonialism, with quite different results.Zitkala-Sa’s mother laments,
“‘We were once very happy.But the paleface has stolen our lands and
driven us hither. Having defrauded us of our land, the paleface forced us
away'” (Zitkala-Sa and Fisher 10).She writes of a happ