Causes of the Cold War

The Cold War was a period in which the United States and the Soviet Union entered a hostile relationship. During the Cold War, the two countries struggled for economic, military, and political superiority. Many Americans and Russians alike questioned the prevalence of their government and economic systems: the capitalistic democracy of the United States or the communist totalitarianism of the Soviet Union. Tensions between the two countries originated from World War II. Even though they were allies during the war, they distrusted each other. The only reason they were allies was simply that they had a mutual enemy, Germany. The Cold War was not an actual war but a period of an antagonistic relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union with numerous causes and events that occurred between 1945 and 1955. The rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union was in part a product of World War II. After the defeat of the Nazi forces, the Soviet Union began to move deeper into Europe in hopes of expansion. They soon amassed many countries under its influence that would carry out its every desire. The United States realized that the Soviet army was the strongest in Europe after Nazi Germany had fallen and resented the fact that American influence in Europe was diminishing. The United States resentment was one of the major causes of the Cold War.
In February of 1945, United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin met at Yalta to discuss the future of the governments freed from Nazi control.The conference also included issues such as the postwar government of Germany and voting arrangements in the new United Nations organization. The most controversial issue was the Yalta Declaration on Liberated Europe, which stated that Eastern Europe would have free elections and constitutional liberties. However, the Polish government was being disputed betwee…