Bread Givers

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What it means to be an immigrant? In the Bread Givers, by Anzia Yezierska, tells the story of life as an immigrant in the Untied States, particularly immigrant women’s pursuit of the American Dream.For many immigrants, the U.S. was the key to a better life, a life free of economic depression and religious oppression. America was a fantasy to all immigrants. The Jewish immigrants used historical analogies to describe sites of Jewish suffering in distinction to America as a place of freedom, opportunity, and promise.
In the narratives that Jewish Americans tell about their collective past in the United States, the Lower East Side functions not just as a particular neighborhood where many Jews lived for some period of time but as exemplary of the Jewish experience in America. They came to America and found instead the Lower East Side, a warren of crowded, dirty, and mean streets. In this slum, these impoverished Jewish immigrants re-created the culture of Eastern Europe, thick with the smells, sounds, tastes, and noises of life in the “Old World.” Lower East Side served as some kind of transitional zone for the Jewish immigrants. In that neighborhood, they underwent an ordeal of cultural reeducation as they learned to be free. The Lower East Side served as a middle ground where the Jewish immigrants dwelled among themselves while waiting for permission to enter the real America. It served as their narrow bridge between slavery and freedom, between the their homeland and the promised land of America.
Jewish immigrants in America, like any other immigrants, faced many obstacles. Their
lives were ran thought by the recurrent themes of oppression, constriction, and danger, on one hand, followed by the expansiveness of liberation, on the other. Immigrants had to adjust to industrial labor, unfamiliar languages, and city life. Clinging to their national identities and religions.
Jewish immigrants worked long and hard, to strongly …

Bread Givers

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

What it Means to Be a Female Immigrate In the novel, Bread Givers, author Anzia Yezierska tells the story of life as an immigrate in the Untied States. For many immigrates, the U.S. was the key to a better life; a life free of economic depression and religious oppression. America was a fantasy to many. Sara’s father lectures to his wife about not needing a feather bed; “Don’t you know it is always summer in America? And in the new golden country, where milk and honey flows free in the streets, you’ll have new golden dishes to cook in…”(Bread Givers, 9) To much dismay, the realization that America was not a land of golden streets comes too quickly. Flooded with people, New York’s Lower East Side becomes a place of poverty for most. Immigrates find themselves living in slums, where dirt and disease runs rampant. Life was arduous for immigrates. However, according to Yezierska, life as a female was much worse. In the 1920’s, an immigrates’ gender ultimately decided what experience he/she would have in America, for it was better to be a male than a female. In Russia, the “Old World”, it was preached that a woman was only on Earth to make her husband happy. In order to get into Heaven, a women had to have a man at her side. America, the “New World, was mingled with different cultures. A female in America, no longer had to live solely for her husband. This clash of conceptions was the cause of numerous confrontations. This can be seen after the father drove away Jacob, Bessie’s true love. Sara titles him “…a tyrant more terrible than the Tsar from Russia.”(Bread Givers, 65) Sara’s sister’s could not enjoy their lives as American’s because of the strong hold their father had on them. As Sara watches her sisters auctioned off one by one into lifeless marriages, she vows not to be like them. All of this would never happen if they were men because men were not slaves to the female race. The struggles of being female were not