Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson was not one of the most effective American Presidents. Jackson became president because everyone liked him. Jackson was said to have been thefirst true president of the common people. In all the uproar about what kind of man Jackson was, the voters failed to learn, Jackson's stands on major issues. Jackson firmly believed that the government should be restricted to a "simple machine, which the Constitution created". This proved that he was truly a man of the people. Jackson's presidency focused mainly on states’ rights, nullification, the tariff, the spoils system, Indian removal and banking policies. Some of his biggest actions were the ;Tariff of Abominations; and the veto of the Second Bank of the United States.
Jackson gained a national reputation after his victory over the British in the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. Everyone from the south liked him because he was a Tennessee slaveholder, a famous Indian fighter, and supported the removal of Indian removal. He was chosen to lead a new political party that would go against Adams; ;National Republicans.; Jackson;s political party was called the Democratic party. Americans related to Jackson because he was viewed as an ;ordinary citizen; and the ;common man.; When election time came, Jackson got more than twice the electoral vote of Adams.
While John Adams was still in office, Jackson;s supporters in Congress completed a bill that would raise tariffs on imported textiles. This bill hurt the South, by raising the cost of manufactured goods for southerners. The Jackson supporters had hoped that southerners would blame Adams for this ;Tariff of Abominations;, but Jackson got most of the blame. Jackson and his vice president, John C. Calhoun, argued about the tariff because Calhoun believed only tariffs that raised the revenue for such thi