Self Efficacy

In the Personality chapter, I have read and learned about perceived self-efficacy. The section about this important cognitive factor was very brief, but I gained a lot out of it. Based on Bandura's cognitive theory, perceived self-efficacy is one's learned expectations about the possibility of achievement in assured situations.Seeing that this is an issue for me, I realize that my perceived self-efficacy about numerous things is very low in many cases.
I have learned that an individual's evident behavior is controlled by their belief that they can successfully carry out a task.I think that a significance of having knowledge of perceived self-efficacy is that an individual with knowledge in this area can learn to look for the good in what I would call, "not so good" tasks/situations that may be presented to them in the future.What I mean by this is that, even if an individual may feel that they may continue to get dealt a bad deck of playing cards, they continue to play the game of life.
Sometimes I feel like the odds of good things happening are against me. A prime example is this:I have put out so many job applications and resumes, yet I still haven't received a phone call from any of the companies that I applied for.I know that I am qualified for many of the positions, since I have all of the credentials.If I didn't meet the qualifications, I wouldn't tell myself otherwise, due to my high perceived self-efficacy about working.I have come to believe that if anyone continues to see things in such a positive way, then they will become a better individual, and everything that they wish for will come to them if they truly deserve it.
In high school, I had the most positive stance about everything I had attempted to do.My self-efficacy was pretty high at that point and time. Now, in college, things are different.I have had a negative mind-set about everything that I have …

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