Tyrannosaurus Rex

As soon as I made it up the basement stairs of the Milwaukee Public Museum and into the foyer, memories began to flood my mind of familiar displays I looked upon as a little kid.I had forgotten the size of the museum's oversized rooms andmammoth hallways that shelter so many colorful displays.Scenes of American Indian life preceding the city of Milwaukee, butterflies from every color of the spectrum and rare antiquities as old as King Tut himself.I immediately began visiting display after vibrant display looking for the things I remember to write about for my description paper.After about ten displays on American Indians it hits me and I remember, Tyrannosaurus Rex and the dinosaurs.
I detoured my visit and traveled directly to the pre-historic reptile display.After bobbing and weaving through what seemed like fifty infant strollers and one hundred day dreaming children I reached my destination.A skeleton of a 41 million year old Stegosaurus was at the entrance to usher in visitors to this Jurassic jungle.The mood was established by walking on a stone path inside of a murky cave with stalactites reaching down to touch the top of my head.To each side of the trail were small presentations on gems and fossils but nothing as attractive or immeasurable as the display I was looking for.
Stone after stone, rock after rock I began to think it was impossible to get to what was the climax of the whole dinosaur exhibit. Then I heard it.Softly atfirst, but with my pace beginning to quicken, the noise became more and more amplified.It was the mighty piercing roar of the real king of the jungle, T-Rex. Once my ears were able to overcome the dominant blare of his majesty, threatening sounds of rolling thunder and crashing lightning befall from the ceiling above.An orchestra composed by crickets play sporadically in the background.A light rain patter falling on everything in its path creates the rhythm.In the …