The trojan women

On November 21, 2004, I attended the Art production of The Trojan Women.The performance was one unlike any other I had ever seen in my lifetime. The play emphasizes the women and children in modern war and how innocent people were actually in more danger than a soldier. More in depth, it focuses on a former queen by the name of Hecuba.After her town was invaded and her husband was killed, she was left with a completely new life; serving as a slave.Her importance stems from her son, Paris, whom Helen was having an affair with.Helen's husband Menelaus furies from this, especially when his wife Helen leaves Sparta to be with Paris.As a result, Menelaus orders his people to invade the Trojans and make them (including Hecuba) all slaves.Adapted by Jean-Paul Sartre, the complex play shows the horrible effects of war and how it ruins lives of millions of innocent people.
The set was something that really helped me grasp the effects of the war in The Trojan Women. The Scenic Designer, Melissa Turner, did an excellent job making the floor of the set look like a war had been fought on it before.Bits and pieces of random things were scattered among the stage, looking like leftovers from peoples' houses and lives.There were parts of a construction site, a bike, a doll, a crate, and a shoe lying around.The costumes were another thing that allowed me to seize the horrifying consequences of the war.The Wardrobe Coordinator, Amrita Ramanan, did an outstanding job with her designs.All the women and children were bare foot, making it look realistic that they were living in a life of poverty.The dresses and outfits in which the women and children wore were all torn rags that didn't match or flatter any of them.The characters' hairs were all messy and they all had a very plain look to them.I found that the set and the costumes really did a lot for my understanding of the play.Especiall