The Marble Statue of Kouros

At the beginning of the Archaic Period of ancient Greece, circa 680 B.C.E., several bronze figures of male youths appeared on the artistic landscape and served as the forerunners of later and similar statues known as kouros, based on Egyptian and Mesopotamian figures which were "essentially geometric, with a triangular torso, a narrow waist and bulging thighs" without any concern for anatomical accuracy (Williams, 324). But with the Greek kouros, we find a naked and rather muscular male figure with long braided hair, a tall and slender body and broad shoulders and chest with the arms held tightly against the body and the hands clenched. The most important trait of this statue is its freestanding posture with one foot ahead of the other as if the figure is in the process of walking, known in art history as contrapposto (de la Croix & Tansey, 135).
Also, as compared to earlier kouros figures from Egypt and Mesopotamia which were composed of bronze, the Greek kouros figures are composed of marble and are finely-chiseled with much concern for detail and anatomical accuracy. There are two basic kouros figures from the Archaic Period of ancient Greece-the kouros from Tenea, circa 570 B.C.E. and approximately five feet tall, an kouros are life size or larger, freestanding stone figures of unclothed young man striding forward. They are considered today to be one of the most distinctive products of the Archaic era, the period of ancient Greek history from roughly about 650 to 500 BCE. The statue’s head, feet and hands all point rigidly straight forward emphasizing the frontal view. As a standing figure, the statue is taller than it is wide. Its vertical orientation is emphasized by a central axis running vertically between the legs, through the navel, the cleft of the chest and between the eye 
First of all, in order to list the similarities and differences between these two sculptures, I considered that it is better to make …