The Bust of Queen Nefertiti

In approximately 1340B.C., Thutmose, sculptor by profession, left some his most memorable art works of art in his workshop in Egyptian city of Akhetaten. Of the various art pieces, the most beautiful and world known is the bust of Nifertiti whose aesthetic values withstood the test of time and can now be eye-witnessed by anyone today who visits Egyptian Museum in Berlin, Germany.
Nefertiti-whose name means “the beautiful one has come”- was the favorite wife of pharaoh Akhenaten IV of the Eighteenth Dynasty, the revolutionary founder of new faith into single god Aten, and the progenitor of a new art style called Amarna. Even though, we have a number of artifacts from that period, all the records show about Nephrite is that some years after her becoming the Queen of Egypt and giving birth to her daughters Nephrite mysteriously disappeared; moreover, very little evidence suggest that she actually died inflaming the numerous inquisitive minds. It has been suggested that Nefertiti and Akhenaten were related. Their facial features are remarkably similar in many ofthe art works depicting both of them which had been done during the earlier years of their marriage.Again, maybe it is the artist to blame for this bold assumption.
The freestanding bust was created during the Amarna period; however, it escaped the almost abstract excess of many other artifacts that forever will stay in its shadow. Considering its beauty, it is fascinating that the bust was found in a workshop at and not on display somewhere in a royal palace. Perhaps the work was never finished due to the evidence of missing details in the left eyeball (it's simply left white). Luckily, this flaw doesn't take away much from the overall presentation of the sculpture; the delicate lines and vibrant colors, which enhance its lifelike quality. It is hard to resist the urge to touch yellow-brown stone surface of her smooth skin, which is probably the finest example of …