Sistine Chapel

Without question the most recognized work of the Renaissance is Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. Named for Pope Sixtus IV della Rovere (1471-1484), the chapel is simple in shape. Its measurements repeat those given in the Bible for the temple of Solomon. But, despite the Sistine Chapel’s structural simplicity, its ceiling is one of the pinnacle achievements in art history. After more than four years, Michelangelo completed his masterpiece ceiling in October of 1512. On it he portrayed the nine stories from the Book of Genesis, including its most famous image, God’s Creation of Adam. The achievement of this work lies not only in the detail and beauty of the artistry, but also in the comprehensiveness of the stories told in the picture.
The Italian Renaissance was called the beginning of the modern age. The most obvious changes during Renaissance times are seen in the Chapel;s paintings and sculptures. Artists began to experiment for thefirst time with oil-based paints. They mixed powdered pigments with linseed oil. The paints dried slowly, and remained workable for a few months. Stonemasons of the Middle Ages began to be replaced by Artists. They used materials like bronze to make the scenes in their bas-reliefs more lifelike. Perspective and light were introduced into art. A team of computer experts recently proved that background architectural details were perfectly proportioned and positioned in relation to the figures in the foreground of some Renaissance paintings. Many Renaissance works of art showed subjects taken from the Bible. Non-religious subjects from Greek and Roman Mythology were also popular. The painters and artists that lived during the Renaissance changed the way the world looked at art for all time.
This was the most frustrating project of his life. Michelangelo spent a year on the gigantic bronze curvatures. Shortly after awarding the contract for the tomb, Juli