Police Memorial

Throughout Battery Park, in downtown New York City, the sculpture I found to be most intriguing is the New York City Police Memorial, by Stuart B. Crawford. Memorials and monuments create solid, deeper meaning to the public.This is because memorials contain certain information, which is clear to the viewers. This New York Police Memorial serves as a constant reminder of the officers who have past away serving the people of the city.The emotion that this piece emits is very different compared to sculptures by Alexander Calder or Ned Smyth's The Upper Room which therefore produce a different kind of interaction of the audience and the piece.In my analysis, I will have a well thought out argument on the reactions of the public to works of public art.I will discus how the Police Memorial's historical background and how it was developed.I will furthermore provide a formal description of the Memorial and how the work functions.
When an artist displays a work of art in a public place he or she must take into consideration many different aspects before making the structure.The degree of interaction that may take place between the public and the work of art is well thought out by the artists.The artist considers what the piece is portraying and the purpose of making art.At the same time, different types of people are attracted to art in different ways.In this case, viewers are either fascinated by the work, reminded of the deceased, taught a lesson or simply admire the work of art. The reaction of this piece by the public ranges greatly, I witness people interacting with the work to eat their lunch or read a book, as well as people walking by it without noticing it.
Memorials are meant to function as a constant reminder of the people that served the nation in some way and who have died while doing so.This is comparable to cemeteries in a way that it is for people to remember the ones that passed away.Mon…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *