Poet Saints

Teachings of the Poet-Saints
Mira generally speaks of “the importance of the name of God and praises the
True Guru in her poetry” (Hawley, 1977).Her poems are not complex in
nature, and very fluid.The emotions explored in her work are those
related to women; typically Mira explores the same type of issues,
especially those related to a “young brides, marriage and woman’s
relationship to Krishna” (Mirabai, 1977).Mira often portrays herself as
married to Krishna or Krishna as yogi in her work.Her poems somewhat defy
different ideas in Hinduism however.Mira imagines her marriage to Krishna
as a “liaison between two Yogis'” which goes against standard Hindi belief,
because a yogi must leave behind his/her family and former life, therefore
two would not be married to one another (Hawley, 1977).

Many of these ideas are expressed in poem no. 177 by Mirabai.The poem
begins with Mirabai exalting the Yogi, to be interpreted as Krishna, and
she refers to him as “my friend, the clever one/ whose mind is on Siva and
the Snake.”Mirabai portrays herself in this poem as a yogini to the yogi.
She talks of coming home, which can be interpreted as going with God, an
idea that is prevalent in much of Hinduism.The themes of God and love are
also very present throughout the poem.In line 8, the poet states “take
me, guard me with your guardian mercy/ please.”The message of this poem
is that the author would do anything to be with the all-knowing yogi,
including giving up her mind and body.God is all powerful and very loved
according to the author in this poem.

Images used in this poem include visions of prayer beads, jewelry, yogi
cloth and rain.She uses these images to define her image of self in the
poem, comparing the image of herself to the image of yogi.She talks of
becoming a yogi in the following stanza:

I’ll take up your yogic garb-
Your prayer beads,

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