Paul Gauguin

Paul Gauguin started off like every man. He had a job, a wife, and children. By the time he was thirty-five he completely devoted himself to his art, which caused him to leave his life as he knew it. Hefirst sailed to Panama and Martinique to escape civilization; he was determined to live primitively. Sadly, illness forced him to move back to France where he spent some time with Van Gogh.He then spent two years in Tahiti writing his journal and painting some of his best works only to come back to France and make little to no money. Disheartened and stricken with syphilis he headed back to the South Seas. In 1897 he tried to commit suicide, failed and lived for five more years to paint. He died on Hiva Oa in the Marquesas Islands.
Gauguin's American debut was in 1913 during which was said, "…bold initiation, one who shipwrecked himself in his efforts to fully express his art." While Gauguin was still in Paris, before his overseas adventures, his colors were very dark and more realistic. The painting of tomatoes and a pewter tankard on a table is a good example. Here he used a natural looking red for the tomatoes, the pewter tankard looked silver, and everything was proportionate to each other.
Three paintings stood out far more than the others did to me. Still life with three puppies, Ia Orana Maria, and Hina Te fatou are those three. The three puppies we saw in class of thefirst paintings by Gauguin I saw, that one left an impact. The colors were brilliant, and even though the pictured was kind of incoherent I still knew what was going on. Along with the color, the fact that nothing was scaled, the puppies were the same size as the cups.
Ia Orana Maria showed me how Gauguin used subtle clues to let you know what was happening. Even thought the name of the painting is in the native Tahitian language, I still knew it was Christ, Mary, and if you looked hard enough you could seen an angel in the back left…

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