Mein Fuhrer…..I can walk

In 1962 Stanley Kubrick made a satire about Nuclear holocaust and he called it "Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned How to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb".Now, more than four decades later,Kubrick's film is an excellent example of human feelings during the early sixties.In fact, the movie continues to be relevant now, as we face our current enemy: global terrorism.
To appreciate the brilliance of this film, one must take into account the psychological and social atmosphere at the time when it was made.The story was written during the fifties; the cold war was in full swing.We were involved in Vietnam.The Cuban Missile Crisis had occurred.Fear and paranoia were at an all time high among the civilian, political, and military populations. It was a time when school children were instructed to "duck and cover" for air raid drills to prepare for a nuclear attack.Fear of "the red army" – the "Rooskies" was omnipresent.The House UnAmerican Activities Committee (HUAC), which began in 1938, was still summoning people to testify against colleagues and friends.Dr. Strangelove perfectly depicts the paranoia and, in doing so, also shows how absurd the whole thing was.
The word “subtle” does not exist in the world of this film. This is, after all, a comedy which addresses nuclear holocaust and mocks the paranoia of its time. The entire film is ironic. The work opens in a serious mood as a plane crew in flight receives a message that they are to bomb Russia. The captain of the crew, Major Kong, is played by Slim Pickens, an actor recognized for his thick Texas accent. After double checking the order to drop the bomb, Kong unlocks a safe and pulls out a cowboy hat and puts the hat on.At this point, it becomes apparent something is seriously wrong with these people.After an initial viewing it becomes clear that Strangelove is a comedy. On a

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