Medea

It has long been debated whether in the play "Medea," Medea was attempting vengeance or justice on Jason.In order to have this argument, you mustfirst find out what vengeance is and what justice is.Vengeance is the act of revenge, getting back someone who has wronged you.Justice is fairness, the act of setting something or someone equal.Therefore, the real argument is whether Jason has committed more wrongs to Medea than Medea has committed against him.
It is true, of course, that Medea had done many things for Jason.Medea explained all this when she said, "I cheated my father for you and tame the fire-breathing Brazen-hoofed bulls; I saved your life in the field of teeth…. I poisoned the great serpent and got you the Golden Fleece; and fled with you, and killed my brother when he pursued us, making myself abominable in my own home; and then in yours I got your enemy Pelias hacked to death by his own daughters' hands….. My rapid and tricky wisdom: you it has served, You it has served well: here are five times." (Medea 255)However, Jason has done many things for Medea's benefit.Jason explains, "…. I carried you out of the dirt and superstition of Asiatic Colchis into the rational sunlight of Greece, and the marble music of the Greek temples….. I have brought you to meet thefirst minds of our time, and to speak as an equal with the great heroes and the rulers of the cities…" (Medea 256)Jason has offered Mede!
a a good life, one which she could have lived happily with her children in Greece.But Medea let her hatred for Jason get in the way of her life.She time and time again insulted Creon and brought exile onto herself.Jason explained, "You have once more affronted and insulted the head of Corinth.This is not thefirst time.I've seen what a fool anger is.You might have lived here happily, secured and honored….. by being just a little de…

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