Manets A Bar at the Folies Bergere

Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Berg;re
Manet’s painting, A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, was an integral factor in the rise of a new era in art; through the emergence of a contemporary Parisian city, Modern art began to flourish during the late 1800’s.Being a painting of extreme complexity and ambiguity, many art critics have commented on the formal aspects of the painting, as well as the social reactions to this specific, and novel form of art. The purpose and meaning of the mirror behind the lady and the disparity of reality versus reflections, pose immense controversy and are discussed in Robert Herbert’s essay, Impressionism: Art, Leisure, & Parisian Society, Bradford R. Collins, Twelve Views Of Manet’s Bar, Jack Flam’s “Looking into the Abyss: The poetics of Manet’s A Bar At the Folies-Berg;re”, and T.J. Clark’s, The Painting of Modern Life.Moreover, these authors’s united their interpretations of this painting with the idea of a new Parisian lifestyle and conduct.
Presented in this painting is the scene of a young, engaging barmaid at the Folies-Bergère music hall.She is standing behind a marble counter, which is covered with wine bottles, fruits, and flowers.Behind her are the essential element of the painting; the mirror that reflects the setting in which she is serving, as well as a peculiar man with a moustache.The barmaid, is confined to the narrow space behind the bar, however in the reflection, Manet introduces the new recreational activities of the elite, and sophisticated Parisians.Despite her lack of expression, Herbert clearly states that Manet has given the barmaid facing the audience a feeling of dignity and self-worth, contrary to the Parisian customs.It was thought that women were hired to increase the sales of drinks, and were made as vehicles for sexual favors, and other kinds of business. Herbert also says that barmaids at the time were known for “loose morals.”He s…

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