john adams book critique

McCullough, David (2001). John Adams. Simon and Schuster.
John Adams was an interesting outlook on the life of John Adams. It displayed his life in a most memorable way that gives the reader a true account of John Adams life and trials he had to overcome to make the United States what it is today. In reading this, we understand about the barriers our fore fathers had to rise above as well as the consequences they overcame for their freedom.
Being born to a rich mother and a Deacon father on October 30, 1735 at his family's farm in Braintree, Massachusetts. Adams took to reading and writing early in life. He recorded daily everything that happened in a journal, which ended up being more than a four-volume autobiography. He loved his family's farm in Braintree, and visited there often as an adult.
Harvard College was where Adams attended and it took several years to decide what career he wanted to follow. He chose to become a teacher in Worcester right after he graduated. Adams soon learned that the teacher's life was not the life for him. His new job put him around many influential people that persuaded him to study law. After Adams was admitted to the Suffolk County Bar, he thought of himself as a fair and thoughtful lawyer.
Boston was sinking into rebellion by the 1760s. The British Parliament began to pass taxes intended for the French and Indian War. The book talked about a series of measures taken to create an "increasingly hostile environment" in the Massachusetts port city. It seemed that people depended on Adams and his ability to draft their complaints even after he defended the troops that opened fire in the Boston Massacre.
Adams was elected to serve at the First Continental Congress. It's no surprise that he impressed his fellow delegates. He nominated George Washington to command a new Continental Army. Adams traveled overseas to gain alliance with France and asked for assist…