Greece drama

In 500 B.C. Greek theatre was the most command way of entertainment.It is important to understand that drama began in the Greek world as a form of religion ritual, but it was good entertainment especially if it contained a lot of blood or gore.
Greek drama was not only performed in the theatre itself but also performed for special occasions such as festivals. The actors sometimes performed competitively for prizes that were awarded. The drama was closely associated with religion; the stories were mainly based on myth or history.
The theater consists of a large circular orchestra, or a dancing floor, for the chorus. More than half of its circumference is surrounded by the audience. The scene or stage is behind the orchestra, facing the audience. The side of the scene facing the audience, served as a back round. It was decorated as a palace or a temple. The flat roof of the scene was dedicated to the gods, which was called the Theologion. The scene had one of three entrances for the actors. Between the scene and the seats was the other two entrances called Parodoi. If someone was coming from the right of the parodos, that meant he was coming form the city or the port. If he came form the left, he was coming form the fields or abroad. The front seats for the audience were called the Proedria and were reserved for officials and the priests.
There were three types of drama that were composed, tragedy, comedy, and satyr plays. Tragedy and comedy were distinguished in many ways. There was the Aristotelian tradition that describes tragedy as a drama which concerns better than average people, like heroes, kings, and gods, who undergo an alteration of good fortune to bad fortune. This serves the purpose of purging the soul of the "fear and pity." Tragedy usually dealt with myths, or events that come from the recent past which had become myths. The important thing was that the audience had some recollection of the story…

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