Corbusier

Corbusier, like many other architects of his time, had an extreme desire to create a perfect architecture. He claims that the one example of perfect architecture has been built, but it was built 2400 years ago: The Parthenon.He felt that if every building was evolved, designed, and constructed in such a way as the automobile was, that all buildings would resemble the Parthenon in esthetics and functionality.
Although most of the pictures that Corbusier used in this chapter were without in-depth descriptions, the message he was trying to convey was quite evident. For the most part, the photos were in order of oldest to newest, showing the changes from each period. Many of the cars had a similar appearance, but the reason for that is because that's what the standard of the time called for. Each year something would change, but once one manufacturer altered their design, all the other followed. This is exactly why he feels that we need to develop a standard in architecture.
All car manufacturers compete against each other in order to see who can construct the best vehicle. They are able to do this because they set a standard very early in the existence of the automobile. If architects and contractors were able to set a standard for building types, they would be able to work towards perfection. They would have a base that they could work off of, allowing them to pay much more attention to detail, as seen in the Parthenon, as well as in high-end sports and luxury cars. He wants for people to pay as much attention to buildings and their ornament as they do with the construction and precision of automobiles and the components that they are comprised of.
I think one of the main reasons Corbusier uses the automobile, as well as airplanes and liners, as examples for comparison, is because they are common forms that are seen in everyday life. The fact that they are objects that everyone is comfortable with allows the readers to be a…