Art Imitating Life Imitating A

The late 1950s saw a new movement in the art world this became known as “pop art” due to the fact that the artists in this movement with this movement manly Andy Warhol and Roy Lichensten of the unites states as well as David Hockney and Derek Boshier of Great Britain, used elements of popular culture as main sources of their work. A good example of this is Warhole’s screen prints of Marilyn Manroe, where he took a famous icon of the time and used a mass production technique to make her into a work of art.
Lichenstine looked at a different element of popular culture youth culture- comic books. He used this style of painting and drawing to create a comic strip image. For example “Wham”, although looks screen-printed
it was infact panted by hand dot by dot.
Hockney was influenced by graffiti a part overlooked by his contemporaries, he used it in the form of messages scrawled across the background of his paintings . Hockney said that he did this in order to make it clear to the viewer what the picture was about.
Derek Boshier painted a series of pieces based on ideas he got from a toothpaste commercial. “identi-kit man” was his way of suggesting how easy it was for companies to manipulate people with the use of advertising and create mass markets.
The whole ideas of pop art, as to take things from everyday life and make them into a piece of artwork. These things were those, which the people of post-war Britain were not ready to consider art in any way. There was a thing like Campbell’s soup can of Warhol, The kitchen utensils of Tom Wesselman and Richard Hamilton and child like scribbles of David Hockney.
Due to the art boom, in the 1960s and clear trends through pop art That designers were able to pick up on these and incorporate them into their work, influenced by fashion icons, movie stars, technology, and motorcars. Although the artists did have some overlapping styles, pop art focuses more on the subject and less on styl…